Custom Search







FACTS ABOUT KOREA AND KOREAN FRIENDS



http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/c/c6/Korean_sword_dance-Jinju_geommu-03.jpg/250px-Korean_sword_dance-Jinju_geommu-03.jpg http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/c/c9/Korean_royal_palace_entrance.jpg/300px-Korean_royal_palace_entrance.jpg
Korea is a geographic area composed of two sovereign countries,
a civilization, and a former state situated on the Korean Peninsula in East Asia. It borders China to the north and west, and Russia to the east, with Mongolia situated farther to the northwest, and Japan to the east. The Korean Peninsula is divided into two separate states,
North Korea and South Korea.

NORTH KOREAN CUSTOMS

From April to May, when trees are beginning to blossom, young couples are found by Taedong River or Pottongang Hotel. They talk with each other sitting in a bench for hours. Most marriages are for love, but if one of their parents oppose the marriage, they will obey.

North Korea is striving to construct utopia by socialistic ways, so the age of marriage is late. The suitable age for marriage is from 28 to 30 for a man, and from 25 to 28 years old for a woman. After the wedding, the couple will go to the statue of the late President Kim Il Sung.


THE OLD TRADITION (The Matchmaker)


At one time, matchmakers were used for half of the weddings in Korea. Families would go to a matchmaker and present their young person with their resumes, and ask them to find someone that is compatible in status and earning potential. Koreans keep precise lineage records and these would be listed on the resume.


Today, the matchmaker no longer exists, and some marriage arrangements are made through large, online dating services like Duo. Most weddings are Western style and these is no small Korean style wedding prior to the main event.

A note about surnames: Family names are limited in Korea and respect for lineage is powerful. There are only about 300 surnames. Families maintain careful records of their ancestry which are important in marriage, school entrance and job applications. Women do not change their surnames after marriage.